Socially induced stress and behavioural inhibition in response to angling exposure in rainbow trout

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It is well known that fish can learn to avoid angling gear after experiencing a catch‐and‐release event, that is, after a private hooking experience. However, the possible importance of social information cues and their influence on an individual's vulnerability to angling remains largely unexplored, that is, social experience of a conspecific capture. The effects of private and social experience of hooking on the stress response of fish and subsequent catch rates were examined. Hatchery‐reared rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), were implanted with heart rate loggers and experimentally subjected to private or social experience of hooking. Private and social experience of angling induced an increased heart rate in fish compared with naïve control fish. While private experience of hooking explained most of the reduced vulnerability to capture, no clear evidence was found that social experience of hooking affected angling vulnerability in fish that had never been hooked before. While both private and social experiences of angling constitute significant physiological stressors for rainbow trout, only the private experience reduces an individual's vulnerability to angling and in turn affecting population‐level catchability.

Walerius, M. L., Gräns, A., Koeck, B., Berger, D., Sandblom, E., Ekström, A., Arlinghaus, R., Johnsson, J. I. (2019). Socially induced stress and behavioural inhibition in response to angling exposure in rainbow trout. Fisheries Management and Ecology, 26, 611-620


Veröffentlicht: 2019
Erschienen in: Fisheries Management and Ecology, 26, 611-620