Matching of resource use and investment according to waterbody size in recreational fisheries

Peer-reviewed

The size of an ecosystem affects ecological interactions, but less is known about how ecosystem size may affect social interactions. We posit that ecosystem size could serve as a basis for understanding and contextualizing social interactions, connecting how ecosystem size influences natural resource investment decisions and the use of ecosystem services. We leverage international (Canada, Czech Republic, Germany, United States of America) inland recreational fishery data to explore whether certain ecosystem sizes receive a disproportionate amount of fish stocked (a measure of resource investment) and attract more angler effort – our measure of an ecosystem service. We find that smaller lentic waterbodies receive a disproportionate amount of fish stocked per area and also attract more angler effort per area consistently in all four countries. Therefore, we find that resource use and resource investment is matched by ecosystem size. We conclude that small waterbodies are prioritized by both managers and users and contribute more (per area) to recreational fisheries compared to large and more visible waterbodies on the landscape. An increasing focus on smaller-sized lakes and rivers, also those anthropogenically created, in science, assessment, and management is warranted.

Kaemingk, M. A., Arlinghaus, R., Birdsong, M. H., Chizinski, C. J., Lyach, R., Wilson, K. L., Pope, K. L. 2022. Matching of resource use and investment according to waterbody size in recreational fisheries. Fisheries Research, 254, 1-6.


Published : 2022
Appeared in : Fisheries Research, 254, 1-6